Connect with us

Hope Pandemic

Renaissance after Covid-19

Published

on

“The Hope Pandemic” series addresses the changing business climate and how we can go digital and shape a new world of sustainability, kindness and community.

Looking back at history, we see that out of the crises of the Middle Ages (including the black death plague) the golden period known as the Renaissance emerged.

It mobilized some of the world’s known thinkers, authors, statesmen, artists scientists and artists, and ushered an exciting period in Europe in art, architecture, culture, economics etc.

The Renaissance spread across the lands, bridging the gap between the Middle Ages and the modern-day civilization that we know today.

Promoted

As we all ponder the Coronavirus and the unsettling unknown before us, can we also think proactively about “Renaissance 2.0” that our world is in dire need of?

Can this period spur our eco-architects, urban planners, artists, entrepreneurs, innovators, teachers and policymakers to synthesize a rebirth of a stronger, more vibrant world with…

– more responsible consumption of resources

– a more circular economy

– new models for inclusive compassionate communities

Promoted

– more dynamic experiences and enjoyment of the arts, nature etc

-more opportunities for SMEs to flourish alongside big business

etc

I hope we can see this period as an incredible opportunity to fix all our broken pieces and launch a bold nextgen world.

Promoted

Features

One Good Thing – A Story of Giving.

Published

on

 

 

Meet Bridgett Lau, Co-founder of One Good Thing, a business that sells innovative eco-friendly products such as Satellite Bluetooth speakers made from reclaimed wood, Messenger bags made from billboards and organic T-shirts.

Founded in 2017, One Good Thing was the result of an epiphany – a personal tragedy, a memorable trip to Asia, and the inherent belief that people are good people. But let Bridgett tell you her story …

 

Tempo: How did you get started?

Bridgett: The idea was simple; to uncover great products all over the world that people would want but that also has a direct positive impact on the planet. It was to give these social enterprises a platform to expand their reach, and ultimately help people make easy, better choices with a halo effect.

Tempo: What you are passionate about?

Bridgett: In business, I am passionate about SMEs and start-ups. I am currently mentoring a number of individuals who are at various stages of growing their businesses.  After exiting my first business venture and three decades in sales, I feel that understanding business roadblocks and having the solutions to fix them is crucial if a business is to grow and achieve its goals. 

In life helping people be the best version of themselves is my underlying motivation. It’s my “Ikigai” (a Japanese word which means the reason for being).

Tempo: Where you want to go in your life?

Bridgett: Wow that’s a tough question and honestly, I am here, I am doing what I want feels right. Pre COVID 19, we had started gaining more traction and with corporates and not just corporate gifting but corporates who are looking to join the circular economy. We are in a phase of padding out how we can help the local economy grow by giving waste a second life as we build a new way in a COVID world.

Tempo: What have you learned from your experience?

Bridgett: I am going to do the top three as my list is endless and changes weekly:

  1. Do not underestimate GRIT. Prior to this business, I thought I had buckets of it but this business has tested me and it nearly broke me. The hardest part is not the beginning, it’s when you come out of the beginning when you think you should know what you’re doing but instead you might be running a different business than the one you planned.
  2. Don’t be afraid to fail. You hear this often but it really does need to be hard-wired into everyday decisions; it’s about the phrase “don’t worry about getting it perfect”. Your logo, the branding, your IG profile, your commercial model… ask questions of experts and try things out. You don’t know what is going to be “perfect” until you try.
  3. The power of your network. It is integral that you know how to bargain and how to develop relationships as a startup and also be genuine with who you are. We have grown by doing this every step of the way.

 

Click to visit her shop – https://www.one-goodthing.com/

Continue Reading

Hope Pandemic

Are your Virtual Meetings Effective?

Published

on

“The Hope Pandemic” series addresses the changing business climate and how we can go digital and shape a new world of sustainability, kindness and community.

The new lockdown has us working via virtual meetings, whether its using Zoom or Microsoft Teams or other solutions.

I’ve found some meetings work well, while others are messy and unfocused. Here are some of my insights on how to improve results.

1. Protocols
Set meeting protocols and communicate expectations to all participants prior to start.

Promoted

2. Punctuality
Ask all participants to arrive on time as it can be disruptive for people to catch up mid meeting.

3. Mute everyone
This is especially important if you have a big group. Background clutter from any one mike can be heard by all, so best to unmute when each person is ready to speak.

4. Moderate well
Try to give attendees the opportunity to engage. One way is to capture questions before the session, and to use tools like “raise hand”.

5: Keep things simple
Don’t be tempted to use all the bells and whistles in the meeting platform; the less cluttered the process the better you will keep everyone’s attention.

6. Know the limitations
Realize that digital meetings may not always be necessary, and that sometimes it’s better to communicate using email or tools like Whatsapp or Slack.

Promoted

And do keep things fluid, fun and engaging 🙂

Continue Reading

Features

Dear Retailer in Pandemic

Published

on

I know you’re hurting. You’re open for business but there’s no sign when shoppers will return.

I’ve walked around the malls (fitted with mask, gloves etc) and greeted by your friendly staff.

The desolation is heartbreaking but not entirely unjustified as people are bracing for a possible second wave.

  1. While I have no silver bullet, here are a few tips to make things a bit better: Make it easier for the shopper to come. Shoppers will peer in for a safety check. If aisles are adequately wide they may venture inside, otherwise they’ll walk.
  2. Social distancing. Obvious, but most flouted. Check queues at the register, and make sure your own staff abide by the rules.
  3. I’ve seen some ‘Sale’ and ‘Welcome’ signs on some shops. Why not combine both? “Welcome back sale”! Psychology is important and little queues make people feel special.
  4. Get your digital shop up! Even if things go back they will not go full physical again, and your online shop will supplement your brick and mortar presence.
  5. Get experiential – whether online or off. People are drawn to brands that make them feel good. Connect via words from the founder, the music, the tribe, the visual, the olfactory…

Stay relevant. Be strong. Evolve.

Promoted
Continue Reading

Trending