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Tempo Photo of the Month: July 2014

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7 Things You Need To Know Before heading To Japan

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Japan has a fascinating and multifaceted culture; it’s immersed in the deepest of traditions dating back thousands of years, however, it’s a society in a continual state of rapid change, with constantly shifting trends.  If you’re looking for something different you are sure to find it in Japan!

By: Nikol Chaprazova

  1. Expect the unexpected when “nature calls”…

In Japan where the variations of toilets ranging from the Japanese squat toilet to Japanese high tech toilets can be quite confusing, however it is most certainly worth the experience. Now, in the photo you can see the Japanese toilet with bidet. There are bidets that come with a bottom-wash button, with variations of water jet strength, a rather curious ‘lady’ button (you’ll have to test that one out yourself) and then there’s the power deodorizer button. There is a translation of what each button does, but not all toilets have that… so the pictures do come in quite handy when you’re playing the guessing game. Also, don’t be surprised if you hear Waltz or a Mozart concerto or the gentle sound of a tickling waterfall while you are sitting on your throne. I admit, it is a rather clever way to cover up all the giggles that happen behind that closed door.

  1. Japan in the home of some of the weirdest vending machines

Wherever you go, there are vending machines: at the station, at school, on the super market toilet, in rural areas, inside of trains, on ferries, literally everywhere.  If you get thirsty in Japan you are almost never further than a few steps away from a vending machine. There are about 5.6 million vending machines in Japan. That means there is one for every 23 people!

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  1. Fantastic plastic-Japan’s fake food displays

Food models, known in Japan as sampuru( サンプル), or “sample,” this waxy, fake food has been around for nearly 100 years and, over time, has evolved beyond restaurant windows. Nowadays, you can get this fake food in any form you want: keychains, flash drives, cell phone charms, and even fake food iPhone cases. When you’re in a restaurant and don’t know Japanese, they are a lifesaver. With their exquisite detail, you know exactly what you’re going to get – what toppings on the ramen, what side dishes with the set meal – and if you really can’t communicate in any other way, all you need to do is point.

  1. Sickness mask mania

First time visitors notice them right away: Sickness masks. For years now, masks have been considered good manners. If you got sick, the polite thing to do was put on a mask so others, especially in crowded urban centers. They are also protection. If you don’t want to get sick, especially if you’re taking your kids to the doctor or if its flu season, then you wear a mask. During the spring, people with allergies often wear masks to help them through the season. But Japan’s sickness mask culture goes beyond that. Celebrities, for example, are often known to wear masks while out in public, enabling them to have regular lives and avoid being spotted. It’s also become a fashion statement. In Japan, many consider having a “small face” as a desirable feature and a large one less so. And thus, even though they do filter out bad air, the “just-for-show mask” caught on.

  1. Bowing

In Japan, people greet each other by bowing. A bow ranges from a small nod of the head to a deep bend at the waist. A deeper, longer bow indicates respect and conversely a small nod with the head is casual and informal. Bowing is also used to thank, apologize, make a request or ask someone a favor. Most Japanese do not expect foreigners to know proper bowing rules, and a nod of the head is usually sufficient. Shaking hands is uncommon, but exceptions are made. At shops and restaurants, customers are typically welcomed by the staff with the greeting “Irasshaimase”. No response is required from the customer.

  1. Don’t tip!

Japan considers itself a service culture, and the Japanese pride themselves on a job well done without any extra gratuitous motivation. Employees are paid well and tipping is considered rude and offensive to both sides. There are some exceptions in some places, however they are rare

  1. Hygiene is on point

The Japanese view on cleanliness as a virtue is drilled in at an early age. Cleanliness is perhaps more important to the Japanese than with any other culture. The Japanese use the same word (kirei) for “clean” and “beautiful” and purification is an important element of all Shinto rituals. When they pray for something important they wash their bodies and dress in a white kimono. Sumo wrestlers throw salt to purify the ring and Japanese taxi drivers wear white gloves to indicate the immaculate state of their taxi. When schoolboys want to hurl out the worst insult they can think of, they call someone a “bacteria.”

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Note: This article is a repost

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10 fun facts about camel races in UAE

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If you’ve lived in the UAE for some time, you’ve probably seen trucks loaded with camels drive past you at some point. Although their main function in the past used to be transportation, in the recent years, camels have found themselves a new occupation – racing. Here are some fun facts about the camel races in the UAE.

  • They take place during the cooler months of the year from October to April.
  • Entry to camel races are usually free and they usually take place between 7 am to 2 pm.
  • Camels are trained twice a day, in the morning and evening for about 45 minutes for each session.
  • The baby camels are taken away from their mothers when they are around one and a half years old. They are ready for racing once they are two years old. Racing camels must be able to run a minimum of 40 kmh.
  • The young camels are introduced to the track with the rest of the herd and are expected to pick up the skill by merely running alongside the older and more experienced camels.
  • The age of the camel determines the length of the race. Young camels between the ages of two to four race only for four or five kilometers while five or six-year-old camels race for about seven to eight kilometers and finally, the camels older than six years’ race for ten kilometers.
  • The best way to experience a camel race is to hop on a pickup trucks that drive on a road alongside the racetrack to keep track of the moving camels.
  • Since child jockeys were banned in the UAE in 2005, robot jockeys ride on the backs of camels. Their whips are controlled by a herder who rides in a pickup truck. However, camel herders do ride the camels during training.

  • Most of the racing camels are females because they are gentler and hence easier to handle than their male counterparts. 
  • If a camel wins a race, the Sheikhs buy the winning camels for about a million or two million dirhams. Therefore, camel racing is also done for economical purposes as it is the Sheikh’s way of funding his people.

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Enjoy film Birds of Prey release along with these exciting fun activities

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Dubai, United Arab Emirates:  In celebration of the highly anticipated ‘Birds of Prey’ release, Reel Cinemas is hosting an exciting carnival-themed pop-up at The Dubai Mall (floor 2, Concourse 1) from January 30 to February 8, 2020.

To bring the latest DC Comics film to life, Reel Cinemas has several activations for ‘Birds of Prey’ fans to enjoy. The ‘Test Your Strength’ attraction is for those who want to find out where they rank on a scale of strong-to-scrawny by swinging Harley Quinn’s trademark mallet. Prizes include goodie bags, plush toys and tickets to attend the star-studded premiere taking place at Reel Cinemas, The Dubai Mall.

Other experiences include ‘Harley’s Salon’ in collaboration with Smashbox Cosmetics offers visitors the chance to try the newly launched Birds of Prey lipstick shades. Fans can also capture their most ‘Quinn-tessentially’ Harley pose in the UV backlight photo booth and create a HD video to share across social media channels.

The ‘Birds of Prey’ activation will be located on Second Floor, Concourse One, adjacent to the lift lobby, The Dubai Mall from January 30 until February 8.

Carnival Themed Pop-Up for Birds of Prey

Carnival Themed Pop-Up for Birds of Prey

 

A Warner Bros. Production, ‘Birds of Prey’ premiered at Reel Cinemas, The Dubai Mall on February 3, 2020. The film follows the story of iconic DC Comics villain, Harley Quinn (Margot Robbie), after her tumultuous break up with The Joker. Birds of Prey is a twisted tale told by Harley herself, as only Harley can tell it.  When Gotham’s most nefariously narcissistic villain, Roman Sionis, and his zealous right-hand, Zsasz, put a target on a young girl named Cass, the city is turned upside down looking for her.  Harley, Huntress, Black Canary and Renee Montoya’s paths collide, and the unlikely foursome have no choice but to team up to take Roman down.

Margot Robbie returns as Harley Quinn, alongside Mary Elizabeth Winstead as Huntress; Jurnee Smollett-Bell as Black Canary; Rosie Perez as Renee Montoya; Chris Messina as Victor Zsasz; and Ewan McGregor as Roman Sionis.  Newcomer Ella Jay Basco also stars as Cassandra “Cass” Cain in her feature film debut.  Directed by Cathy Yan from a script by Christina Hodson, the film is based on characters from DC.  Robbie also produced, together with Bryan Unkeless and Sue Kroll.  Walter Hamada, Galen Vaisman, Geoff Johns, Hans Ritter and David Ayer served as executive producers.

To book a ticket or view show timings for Birds of Prey visit:  https://www.reelcinemas.ae/

 

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